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The Pounamu Prophecy - birth of a book Two women, two cultures and an ancient Maori prophecy that will change their lives. That's the tag line for The Pounamu Prophecy - my first novel. It has been a slow process, interrupted by moving...

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Can I eat mussels if I have high cholesterol?Can I eat mussels if I have high cholesterol? The short answer is yes - you can eat mussels if you have high cholesterol. Mussels are low in kilojoules, cholesterol and fat. The little fat they do have is mostly healthy unsaturated fat with plenty...

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Bran MuffinsBran Muffins These bran muffins (adapted from a recipe by Alison Holst) are super filling - a great snack when you are trying to control your weight. Enjoy these muffins with a cup of tea but don't expect to absorb...

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Beat the flu with Chicken Noodle Soup It’s Queen’s Birthday holiday today in New Zealand and thank goodness, the sun is shining. I’m sitting in a sunny room writing this post, sheltered from the icy wind blasting up from Antarctica....

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My nanna's recipe for homemade Rewena (Maori) bread Rewena Bread Step 1 1 c flour 1 tsp sugar 1 potato Peel and cut potato into small pieces. Place in pot with 1 cup water, lid on, and simmer to mashing consistency. Mash, cool and when luke...

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Give us this day our daily bread…

Posted on : 27-05-2017 | By : Cindy | In : Aging, Bread, New Zealand, Older-age, Policy watch & public health, Research

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‘I need to eat more bread for protein,’ my 79 year old mother announced over the phone.

‘Bread?’ I countered in my ‘dietitian/daughter knows best’ voice. ‘Milk would be better, or nuts or tuna.’

‘Well, the report said that bread is a good way for us older people to keep up our protein so I’ve just bought myself a lovely, little loaf from the French bakery and eaten the whole lot!’ my Mum replied.

The moment I got off the phone I searched for the report she had cited, convinced that she was somehow mistaken. But there it was, the LiLACS study by Professor Ngaire Kerse and Professor David Cameron-Smith, Chair in Nutrition at the University of Auckland’s Liggins Institute following the health of almost 1000 people (Maori and European) aged 80-90 years. It’s the world’s first longitudinal study of an indigenous population aged 80 or over. Highly timely considering that over the next ten years there will be an estimated 166% increase in Maori reaching this age.

So where does the protein – bread story fit in? Protein is needed to maintain muscle mass. We need muscles not only to give us a great shape but more importantly to keep us strong and steady on our feet. Elderly people need strong muscles to stay active, mobile and to reduce the risk of falling. This is why the recommended daily amount rises an extra 10-15 grams for people over 70 to 57 grams for women and 81 grams protein for men.

How much protein is in bread? I raced to my pantry, pulling out bread, milk, tuna and peanut butter to check the labels. Here’s what I found.

Two 45g slices of my organic wholemeal bread = almost 10g protein  (Bread varies in protein content depending on ingredients so check your own favourite loaf.)

A small cup of milk (200mls) = 7.g

A small tin (95g) tuna = 15g

Two teaspoon 100% peanut butter (20g) = 5.6g

1 egg = 6g

150g fillet steak = 40g

Bread can’t compete with meat for being a protein powerhouse but it certainly helps. Some current ‘healthy’ diets vilify and exclude bread as a criminal carb. Yet bread, especially slow rise, sourdough, has been a  staple part of the diet for thousands of years, providing energy, protein, vitamins and fibre.

Prof. Cameron-Smith said that elderly people lose muscle on the current ‘healthy’ diet and that bread is an important protein to help combat this. A sedentary, middle aged person might well do with eating less bread but for those heading towards 80 who find their appetite waning or meat too hard to chew, a peanut butter or cheese sandwich might be just the protein boost your muscles need.

http://m.nzherald.co.nz/brand-insight/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503637&objectid=11858469

The Pounamu Prophecy – birth of a book

Posted on : 06-09-2015 | By : Cindy | In : Book reviews, Event buzz, New Zealand, The Pounamu Prophecy

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Two women, two cultures and an ancient Maori prophecy that will change their lives. That’s the tag line for The Pounamu Prophecy – my first novel. It has been a slow process, interrupted by moving countries several times, childbirth, motherhood, nutrition work and the plain fact that I am a very slow writer!

Writing a first novel is like setting yourself an assignment with no deadline, that likely no-one else is interested in. There is no weekly pay cheque, no emotional massage of ego, and no-one who is interested in listening to your struggles over character, perspective or plot. It wasn’t until I joined a writer’s group that the gestation of The Pounamu Prophecy started to pick up pace. A good writer’s group is a ‘god-send’ and I would never have finished this book without the encouragement and brutal honesty of my writer’s group. They do not let me get away with anything!

Everything about this book has been slow. The title, as I mentioned in a previous post, changed four times. The cover also took months of back and forth design options and a couple of mad dashes up to the point above Mission Bay in Auckland to get the perfect photo. Early one morning, after dropping my husband at the airport for a 6am flight, I had driven up to the point and taken some shots with my iPhone in the hope that they might work as a cover design. The publisher liked them and asked for a high res photo but I had already left Auckland. I desperately called my brother, asking him to take the picture at the same time and in the same place that I had stood. In between ward rounds, an exam and a four hour drive, he managed to do it and I am eternally grateful. In the end, the publisher miracuously found the same shot on Getty Images and that is what is on the cover.

The Pounamu Prophecy owes its existence to many people: the writing group, my brother, Rhiza Press for editing out all the cringe-worthy stuff, the other publishers who sent the most encouraging comments along with their answer of ‘No’, the elders at Ngati Whatua who graciously answered all my questions, my father-in-law who guided me in all things Maori, my husband and sister-in-law for the beautiful face on the cover, and my other sister-in-law for the title-inspiring gin and tonics on a balcony in Bangkok!

The Pounamu Prophecy comes out in October with an author talk/launch at Balmain Library, Sydney on 12 November. I hope and pray that those who read it will be encouraged, inspired and entertained.

Kia hora te marino, kia whakapapa pounamu te moana, kia tere te karohirohi. May the calm be widespread, may the surface of the ocean glisten like greenstone and may the shimmer of summer dance across your path forever.

The Pounamu Prophecy

Posted on : 13-03-2015 | By : Cindy | In : Maori kai, Milestones, New Zealand, Traditions

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COVER5hAt last, after months of prayer and pondering I finally have a title for my novel. The book has had four different names. If it was a person it would surely be suffering an identity crisis from so many changes! But thanks to my husband and sister-in-law, helped along by a few drinks sitting on a balcony in Bangkok, we have come up with a fantastic title: The Pounamu Prophecy.

Pounamu is a beautiful word for a beautiful stone. It is the Maori word for greenstone, a unique type of jade found only in the South Island of New Zealand. It is a sacred stone,  treasured by Maori as a sign of status or power and used for making peace. It is often carved into pendants and other jewellery which many tourists buy when they visit New Zealand.

In the past it was also carved into tools and weapons. Sometimes these valuable and most beautiful weapons were given to another tribe as a peace agreement. Pounamu is still used this way today. My husband’s tribe gave pounamu as a gesture of peace to another tribe after a dispute over his beautiful Mum’s body.

As a child I grew up on top of a hill where once stood a Maori pa site. A pounamu mere (a short flat club carved in the shape of a tear drop) was found in my father’s vegetable garden. (It was given to the local museum.)

Pounamu is smooth and cool to the touch. It has a depth of pattern, as though looking into the deepest green waters. In The Pounamu Prophecy, Helene, one of the characters, experiences the cool, soothing effect of this remarkable stone. It is a stone that one could readily endow with spiritual qualities but as Helene is reminded by her friend, Mere, ‘It is not the stone, but the maker of the stone that gives us peace.’

Shalom. Kia tau te rangi marie.

 

Slideshow : My omega-3 talk-fest, Nov. 2011 Nelson Aquaculture Conference …

Posted on : 12-02-2012 | By : Cindy | In : New Zealand, Seafood, Slideshow, Super-healthy...er...stuff

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Sorry! I haven’t added any audio, maybe I’ll add it later if there’s some interest, let me know … Cindy

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